The Gourmet Country Girl

Homemade Lemon Pepper Seasoning

Homemade Lemon Pepper Seasoning

How to make lemon pepper seasoning that will keep for a while is a lot easier than you may think.

Salt has been used for centuries to keep meats and fish from going bad. This is still the case in many Scandinavian countries, where some of the healthiest people in the world reside today. Since most lemon pepper seasoning recipes have salt in them, why not use it as the natural preservative in this recipe?

Using heat to dry the lemon zest out prevents mold or mildew from forming on it, plus heating it also keeps the seasoning from sticking together. This is way better than maltodextrin, so when you make this homemade seasoning, don’t skip this step!

You can add as much or as little of the salt and pepper as you like, but I like my lemon pepper seasoning a little salty because I think it really brings out the depth of the lemon flavor. You want this to be bright – but not too bright.

So go ahead – make your favorite lemon pepper recipe with peace of mind tonight. This 3-ingredient recipe is so easy that you will never again have to resort to grabbing the store-bought stuff simply for the sake of saving time.

     

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Homemade Lemon Pepper Seasoning

Avoid ingredients you can't pronounce - make your own lemon-pepper seasoning at home. It's easy, fast, and requires only lemon zest, salt and pepper.
Course Condiments, Seasonings, Spices
Cuisine Indian
Total Time 10 minutes
Servings 2 Tablespoons
Calories 2kcal
Author The Gourmet Country Girl

Equipment

  • microplane zester
  • small skillet
  • spice mill

Ingredients

  • 2 tbsp lemon zest
  • 1 tsp fresh ground black pepper
  • ½ tsp salt

Instructions

  • Zest two medium-sized lemons (about 2 tablespoons zest). Be careful not to get the white pith under the yellow skin as it tends to be bitter.
  • Heat a small cast iron skillet over medium-high. Toss the zest into the skillet and heat for about 2 to 3 minutes, shaking the pan frequently to prevent the zest from burning. You'll know when it's done when the texture is like that of shredded coconut. There should be little to no moisture.
  • Transfer the zest to a spice mill and pulse several times until it is finely ground into a powder. Add the salt and pepper and pulse a few more times to mix throughout.
  • Store any unused zest in an small, airtight glass jar and refrigerate for up to a month.

Nutrition

Serving: 1tsp | Calories: 2kcal | Carbohydrates: 0.6g | Sodium: 194mg | Potassium: 11mg | Fiber: 0.2g | Sugar: 0.1g
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